Overview of Issue 26

Article By: 

Dr. Ed Shenk is currently an Associate professor and the Program Director for Alliant International University's Hufsedler School Of Education (HSOE), Educational Leadership & Management (ELM) program, at the San Francisco Bay campus. He joined Alliant International University in July 2005 and started fulltime in January, 2006 after retiring from Napa Valley College where he was the Vice president of Student Services. He served at NVC for 30 years and was in community college administration for 35 years. Ed began as an administrator at Napa College in 1975 and served as the Chief Student Service Officer on campus beginning in 1981. His title was upgraded to Vice President, Student Services in 1987. He served as the Affirmative Action Officer and sat on the District-Faculty negotiations team for 14 years as some of the experiences he had at the college.
He continues to serve as the editor of the web based iJournal which focuses on community college issues in California and the nation. You can access the iJournal at www.ijournal.us . He has served as the Editor of the iJournal since January of 2006.

Author Image: 
Dr. Ed Shenk is an Associate professor & the Program Director for HSOE ELM.
Abstract: 

In this issue, our authors explore Innovative Approaches to Student Service Delivery. The beauty of the community college is that it is forever moving forward and finding new ways to serve the students who enroll.  These students are seeking a new job or a new direction in their career paths, be it a vocational degree or the first step toward a BA or higher degree.  As noted by several leaders in Washington, the community college will be the engine that helps to train the existing work force and new citizens in addressing the challenges of the 21st century. The writers in this issue offer some ideas on how to provide a better path and an acknowledgement of this effort. There is also a paper on Prerequisites and the Proposed Revisions to Title 5 as well as the final part of our series on undocumented students in higher education.

 

Article: 

The rains and the grey days of late fall and early winter are upon us in the Napa Valley. The grapes have been harvested, later than most years, but the outcome should be very good. the holiday bells rung in lots of good cheer.  Unfortunately, this is not  the case for educational finance today or in the new year.  In several of our most recent issues, writers have focused on the impact of the continuing budget shortfall our colleges are experiencing. While we all realize the importance of education, efforts to address the allocation shortfalls are mired in partisan politics, pledges not to tax and difficult decisions to raise tuitions. The need for a clear vision of how to address the deficit and bring the state and the nation out of the red is lost in high unemployment, a slow job market and the narrow point of view that less government will solve all of our problems.

The expectation of a bottom and a slow recovery is offered by some economists and may prove to be true sooner than later.  In the short run, our colleges continue to have dedicated leaders, administrators, faculty and staff devoted to the success of their students seeking a community college education.  In this issue, our authors explore Innovative Approaches to Student Service Delivery. The beauty of the community college is that it is forever moving forward and finding new ways to serve the students who enroll.  These students are seeking a new job or a new direction in their career paths, be it a vocational degree or the first step toward a BA or higher degree.  As noted by several leaders in Washington, the community college will be the engine that helps to train the existing work force and new citizens in addressing the challenges of the 21st century. The writers in this issue offer some ideas on how to provide a better path and an acknowledgement of this effort.

The Sponsor for this issue is California Community College Chief Student Service Administrators Association (CCCCSSAA). The President is Peter White, Vice President of Student Services at San Diego City College.

In The Power of My Citrus Story:  How Student Narratives Have Personalized Citrus College’s Mission, Vision and Values,  Geraldine Perri shows how storytelling can be used to offer guidance for those dealing with life’s transitions. This article describes how My Citrus Story, an initiative of Citrus College, which provides an account of individual student experiences at the college, demonstrates the power of community colleges in changing the destiny of individuals. This article is followed by Students’ Perceptions of the First-Year Experience in Developmental Education, co-authored by Julianna Barnes and William Piland. In the article, the authors explain how First-Year Experience programs have the potential to improve student success in developmental education.  This article explores factors from the students’ perspectives that may contribute to the early success of students enrolled in developmental education. 

The focus shifts to Improving Student Retention: The Role of the Cafeteria.  In this article, the author, Kevin Trutna, examines the cost-benefit analysis of operating the college cafeteria at Yuba College.  All college expenditures were examined for potential cost savings, but more importantly, for their impact on student success.  The college cafeteria was scrutinized specifically for its impact on student retention and success.  Jasmine Ruys in Innovation in Admissions and Records shares how the Admissions and Records office at the College of the Canyons implemented innovation in a small way that made a huge difference to the staff and students. This article walks the reader through the small steps taken to change how the A&R office welcomed students to their campus.  On another front, Beth Hoffman proposes in her article High Risk Alcohol Prevention that, while students enrolled in community college participate in fewer high-risk alcohol-related events than their four-year university counterparts, the catastrophic secondary effects or consequences are no less traumatic, violent or dangerous. She addresses the consequences of these events and intervention techniques to increase high-risk alcohol prevention for community college students.

In our Current Issues section, Audrey Yamagata-Noji and Jim Ocampo in their paper, California Community Colleges: Prerequisites and the Proposed Revisions to Title 5, discuss the changing regulatory language related to prerequisites that has created a much needed dialog related to student success and access and equity.  The authors suggest, that a solution can be applied in a holistic context, which may very well lead to comprehensive improvements for community college students and their educational success.

 Finally, we conclude the two part series by Carmen Martinez on The Lives of "Undocumented" Students in Education, Part Two.  This article is the final installment of a that analyzes how “undocumented” students make sense of school, schooling, and their social standing in the U.S. Based on two years of ethnographic research with 20 undocumented Mexican immigrant college students in California, this study examines the factors that have led these students to abandon their state of “social invisibility” and participate in higher education. The series continues with Confronting Obstacles through Agency and Social Networks. This final part explores the obstacles, safety issues and civic engagement these students enter experience. The conclusion weighs in on the desire for the students to pursue higher education and not to wait for the resolution of the political debates. 

As always, the iJournal’s editorial board will consider articles that are focused on student services, collaboration with academic services, or other issues impacting community college education in California and throughout the nation.  Book reviews are always welcome, as are any staff development activities scheduled after January 1.  You can go to www.ijournal.us to view the 26th issue of the iJournal to check out the format and style.

In our next edition, we would like your insight on quality transfer program collaboration and proactive steps colleges can take to facilitate the transfer effort from two-year to four -year institutions.  If you want to submit an article, the text should be 500-2000 words in Word/HTML format using Times New Roman, 12pt font. The submission must also include an abstract of the article, a short bio and a picture of the author in .jpg format (file no larger than 100 KB).  Sponsors are also welcome to contact the editor for informaiton on how to sponsor one issue or more.

Please consult with the editor before including charts and/or tables in your article. Articles can be submitted to editor@ijournal.us  or eshenk@alliant.edu . The submission deadline for the winter 2011 edition is March 1, 2011.

Comments and observations on the articles and theme are always welcome. Thank you for your interest and support of the ijournal.

Ed Shenk, Editor